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As Australia commemorates ANZAC Day, it is appropriate to briefly remember Gallipoli’s Hellenic links. The disastrous Gallipoli campaign, which commenced on 25 April 1915 as an attempt to seize the Dardanelles and open a sea route to Constantinople (Istanbul) to enable Britain to establish a southern front against her enemies and alleviate Russia’s southern supply problems by knocking Turkey out of the Great War, is regarded by many as a turning point for Australia: Our young nation’s “baptism by fire”. For most Australians it conjures up images of bravery, mateship and honour; not to mention death, destruction and sacrifice.

To the Turks, the Gallipoli campaign is considered a defining moment for Kemal Ataturk and modern Turkey as the foreign invaders were repelled. For the British, it is another example of poor decision-making while running a war from a room/bunker in London. For the people of Lemnos (about which I have written elsewhere), it is the hospital, recreation site and base for the Allied campaign of 1915.

Gallipoli is derived from the Greek term, kali poli: good town. In Turkish, it is known as Gelibolu, which is a play on the Greek name. Gallipoli was settled in the 600s BC by Ionian and Aeolian settlers. Twelve towns were established on the peninsula of the Hellespont, the body of water now called the Dardenelles (another Greek link with Dardanus being an ancient Hellenic polis on the Asian shore of the strait, which in turn took its name from Dardanus, a son of Zeus and Electra.) Not far from Gallipoli, at Aegospotami, the Spartan commander Lysander defeated Athenian forces in 405BC bringing an end to the Great Peloponnesian War. The Hellenic character of the region did not change much over 2,600 years. What did change was who controlled the area. Greeks, Persians, Romans, Byzantines and Ottomans have all claimed the peninsula.

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Friday, 20 April 2018 12:00

What's New (20/04/2018)

Upcoming Events

  • Sat Apr 21
    • 8:00AM, St Alexandra - English Liturgy
    • 4:00PM, Vespers
  • Sun Apr 22
    • 8:00AM, Sunday of the Holy Myrrhbearers - Matins & Divine Liturgy
  • Mon Apr 23
    • :30AM, Great Martyr George the Trophy-Bearer - Divine Liturgy
  • Apr 25
    • 7:30AM, Apostle and Evangelist Mark - Divine Liturgy
  • Sat Apr 28
    • 8:00AM, The Nine Martyrs of Cyzikus - English Liturgy
    • 4:00PM, Vespers

 

Sunday Epistle & Gospel Explanations
Sunday of the Holy Myrrhbearers (22/04/2018)

Epistle: Acts 6:1-7

Gospel: Mark 15:43-47; 16:1-8

Click here to download this week's readings and explanations.

Tuesday, 17 April 2018 17:24

Archbishop Iakovos and Martin Luther King

Two weeks ago, on April 4, various commemorative services were held in the United States to mark the 50th anniversary of the assassination of civil rights leader Dr Martin Luther King. In those difficult and turbulent times, many parts of the American south were crucibles of hate. So much so that on March 11, 1965, white American Unitarian minister James Reed was brutally clubbed to death by segregationists while marching for civil rights in Alabama. Days later, on March 25, Martin Luther King led thousands of non-violent demonstrators to the steps of the Alabama capitol in Montgomery, after a 5-day 54-mile march from Selma. Archbishop Iakovos would travel to Selma and march with King for a few hours. The photo below is of Archbishop Iakovos marching with King as King holds a wreath for Reed’s memorial service.

Many Greeks have seen this iconic "Life" magazine cover below. Not all appreciate the courage it took for a Greek Orthodox leader at that time to stand arm in arm with African-American leaders. Coretta Scott King, King’s widow, would later highlight how important it was to have the support of Archbishop Iakovos:
"At a time when many of the nation’s most prominent clergy were silent, Archbishop Iakovos courageously supported our Freedom Movement and marched alongside my husband, and he continued to support the nonviolent movement against poverty, racism and violence throughout his life."

Archbishop Iakovos explained that it was that obligation to speak up that led him to Selma:
"We have fought oppressive and repressive political regimes, based on Christian principles, for centuries. A Christian must cry out in indignation against all persecution. That’s what made me walk with Martin Luther King Jr. in Selma."

 

Dr John N Yiannakis OAM

Friday, 13 April 2018 12:00

What's New (13/04/2018)

Upcoming Events

  • Sat Apr 14
    • 8:00AM, Renewal Saturday - Divine Liturgy (Combined Serviced at Monastery of St John)
    • 4:00PM, Vespers
  • Sun Apr 15
    • 8:00AM, Sunday of Thomas - Matins & Divine Liturgy
  • Sat Apr 21
    • 8:00AM, St Alexandra - English Liturgy
    • 4:00PM, Vespers

 

Sunday Epistle & Gospel Explanations
Sunday of Thomas (15/04/2018)

Epistle: Acts 5:12-20

Gospel: John 20:19-31

Click here to download this week's readings and explanations.

 

Greek Orthodox Christian Society of Sydney - "Lychnos" Magazine

The "Lychnos" is a Greek Orthodox magazine produced specifically for young people by the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of Australia. It covers current issues facing young people, scripture readings, questions and answers, and more. We highly recommend reading through it. The April/May edition of the "Lychnos" magazine is out and can be downloaded from here.

Some of the stories that you can read about are:

  • Πάσχα - Passage, Ανάσταση - Resurrection!
  • Loneliness in Our Times
  • How Do We Know We Have a Soul?

...and much more!

Tuesday, 10 April 2018 20:42

Christ is Risen!

Truly He is Risen!

On Sunday we celebrated Christ's Resurrection from the dead. Having prepared ourselves during the period of Great Lent and Holy Week, it was quite a celebration indeed.

As always, it was a very special service and we are thankful to have seen so many people this year.

Photos from the day have been uploaded to our Photo Gallery here.

Sunday, 08 April 2018 21:21

Easter Eggs

A beautiful photo of traditional Orthodox Easter Eggs, sent in by one of our parishioners. Using only natural colouring and methods, these eggs in the Orthodox Church are said to represent new life.

Sunday, 08 April 2018 00:00

Easter Encyclical 2018

GREEK ORTHODOX ARCHDIOCESE OF AUSTRALIA

 

STYLIANOS

by the grace of God
Archbishop of Australia
to the Reverend Clergy and the devout Faithful
of our Holy Archdiocese

***********

Brother Concelebrants and Beloved children in the Lord,

Christ is Risen!

"Today a sacred Pascha has been revealed to us;
a Pascha new and holy, a Pascha mystical,
a Pascha all-venerable, Pascha, the Redeemer Christ himself;
a Pascha that is blameless, a Pascha that is great,
a Pascha of believers".

With these triumphal cries, our Church greets the Passions and the Resurrection of the God-Man each year.

As we heard and read, infinite are the adjectives used by the Hymnographer of the Church to express in some way the Mystery of God which is inaccessible to the human mind.

Yet, how many of these adjectives continue to resonate truly within our hearts today, following the radical reassessment that all the values of life have undergone around us?

Who will give back to us the pure feelings necessary for us to taste Pascha once again, as described by the Hymnographer; holy, all-venerable, great, mystical?

Pascha means passage and crossing: From death to life. From grief to joy. From despair to hope. From darkness to light. From the ephemeral to the eternal. From the vain and false to the holy and unwavering. Pascha means that life swallows death every minute, and indeed, through death.

Pascha cannot be understood without the Paschal Lamb who gave to life a different taste. And this Lamb is Christ Himself.

Another "blameless" Pascha does not exist without Him and beyond Him.

That is why our Church chants: "Pascha, the Redeemer Christ Himself".

To Him be the glory and the dominion unto the ages of ages. Amen!

With fervent blessings in the Risen Christ

 

Archbishop STYLIANOS

EASTER 2018

Download the English / Greek version.

Saturday, 07 April 2018 18:45

Holy Friday Photos

Last night, Holy Friday, we had the Procession of the Epitaphios. It was a wonderful service.

Photos from the evening have been uploaded to our Photo Gallery here for your viewing.

Friday, 06 April 2018 12:00

What's New (06/04/2018)

Upcoming Events

  • Sat Apr 7
    • 7:00AM, Holy Saturday, The Descent of the Lord into Hades - Divine Liturgy St Basil the Great
    • 11:30PM, Holy Saturday Evening - Orthros & Easter Service, Resurrectional Divine Liturgy St John Chrysostomos
  • Sun Apr 8
    • GREAT AND HOLY PASCHA
    • 6:00PM, Easter Sunday - Vespers of Love (Combined Service at Church of St Nectarios)
  • Mon Apr 9
    • 7:30AM, Renewal Monday - Divine Liturgy
  • Tue Apr 10
    • 7:30AM, Renewal Tuesday, Raphael, Nicholas and Irene the Martyrs - Divine Liturgy
  • Fri Apr 13
    • 7:30AM, Renewal Friday, Theotokos of the Life-Giving Font - Divine Liturgy
  • Sat Apr 14
    • 8:00AM, Renewal Saturday - Divine Liturgy (Combined Serviced at Monastery of St John)
    • 4:00PM, Vespers

 

Sunday Epistle & Gospel Explanations
GREAT AND HOLY PASCHA (08/04/2018)

Epistle: Acts 1:1-8

Gospel: John 1:1-17

Click here to download this week's readings and explanations.

Monday, 02 April 2018 12:57

Bible Study Review - March 22

We would first of all like to acknowledge the efforts of Father Emmanuel, the spiritual Father for many of us, in preparing and conducting the Bible Study lessons each week. They allow us to grow in knowledge and spiritual understanding for the ultimate goal of drawing nearer to God. Furthermore, it should be noted that the ideas drawn in this article are merely summations of the talks given to us each week, and are not intended to replace the talks themselves.

It seems suitable to first set the focus point for the lesson in question. While there were many ideas and points covered, the general idea was that of love. To speak of love, how can we not speak of God? As Father repeats time and time again, "God is love". If a person says that they love God but still holds a grudge against their neighbour, the person is fooling themselves. For it is not possible for them to say that they love God and not love their neighbour.

"Beloved, let us love one another, for love is of God; and everyone who loves is born of God and knows God. He who does not love does not know God, for God is love. In this the love of God was manifested toward us, that God has sent His only begotten Son into the world, that we might live through Him. In this is love, not that we loved God, but that he loved us and sent His Son to be the propitiation for our sins. Beloved, if God so loved us, we also ought to love one another." (1 John 4:7-11)

It is important to note here that unless something is done out of love, it has little benefit. Take, for example, the Pharisees, whom we so often use to show this contrast. The Pharisees were focussed with correctness and conventionalism. Being more concerned with correct practise, they left little space for God, and so became blind to the Truth. They could not even see the Lord standing before them, despite all the miracles and wonders performed by Him. They had no love in their hearts, and so God could not dwell in them. So it is with us! If we become too preoccupied with what we do and how we do it, and have no love in our hearts, we can also fall into the same trap.

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